Tag: organization behaviour meaning

Definitions of Organizational Behaviour

Different authors have defined Organizational Behaviour. Some of the definitions given by prominent authors are as follows.

The study of human behaviour in organisational settings, the interaction between human behaviour and the organisation, and the organisation itself is known as organisational behaviour.

According to L. M. Prasad

“Organisational behaviour can be defined as the study and application of knowledge about human behaviour related to other elements of an organisation such as structure, technology and social systems.”

The author explains that human behaviour should be studied and this knowledge is applied to know its relationship with other domains of the organization such its structure, what technology it is using and the social system it is surrounded by.

According to Fred Luthans

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“Organisational behaviour is directly concerned with the understanding production and control of human behaviour in organization”.

This definition relates how human behaviour in an organization has a significant impact on the production in an organization. Off course the behaviour builds a good organizational environment and organizational environment. Top-to-bottom, bottom-to-top, and horizontal communication definitely built by organizational behaviour which in turn cultivates an acceptable discipline. This increases the productivity and lessens the accidents in an organization.

Stephen P. Robbins states as

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“Organizational Behaviour studies the impact that individuals, groups and structure have on behaviour within organization for the purpose applying such knowledge toward improving n organizations effectiveness.”

How a person, a group and an organizational structure have consequences on the behaviour of an individual within the organization will be studied under Organizational Behaviour. This knowledge will be applied to increase the productivity of an organization

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